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Researchers from the Centre for Academic Primary Care at the University of Bristol have created a unique dataset of 300 GP/patient consultations that will soon be made available for research and educational purposes.

Bristol researchers launch unique dataset of gp patient consultations

Millions of consultations between GPs, patients and caregivers happen across England every day. Despite this, and the importance of communication for health care outcomes, research and/or teaching based on datasets of recorded encounters are relatively uncommon. The research team on the School funded study successfully recorded 327 adult patient consultations with 23 different GPs between July 2014 and April 2015 and 89% consented to having their data archived to allow researchers access to it. Academic researchers will have access to the dataset via the University of Bristol Research Data Repository from March this year. Read the full press release.

The One in a Million team will be showcasing the data archive, outline conditions and procedures for access at a launch event on Friday 4 March in Bristol. To register, please visit the website: 

http://www.bristol.ac.uk/primaryhealthcare/news/2016/one-in-a-million.html

Opportunities for academic researchers and teachers to work with high-quality existing consultations datasets are few and far between. So in line with a wider push towards making publicly funded research data available to the scientific community we were funded by the NIHR School for Primary Care Research to create this unique dataset. This dataset is a hugely valuable resource for a wide variety of health communication research because in addition to the consultations data, each recording is also linked to wider patient survey and anonymised medical records data."
- Dr Rebecca Barnes, Principal Investigator