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  • 1 April 2019 to 30 December 2019
  • Project No: 430
  • Funding round: FR17

People aged over 85 years are the fastest growing section of our population. We know that this population has high risk of multiple morbidity and frailty and as such are likely to be in receipt of unpaid (or informal) care from a family member.

The Newcastle 85+ study began in 2006, following over 1,000 people aged 85 years (born in 1921) to collect a wide range of information on their health, family and social circumstances.

Ten years later (2016), the research team got back in touch with people who took part in the original 85+ study, as they reached 95 years. Many of these survivors indicated that they receive support from someone in their family who assist the older person with a range of tasks. We would like to find out from these family carers, what it is like to care for their older relative, the impact this has on their own health and well-being and how best they could be supported in this role, in their own words.

To do so, we will conduct in-depth interviews with approximately 25 family carers who will be identified through participants in the Newcastle 85+ study. We will ask them questions about their day to day experiences and in particular, their interactions with health and social care on behalf of their relative, and for themselves.

These insights will allow us to identify the most important kinds of support this group of carers would benefit from – and provide ideas how any unmet need could be met through health, social care and the voluntary sector.

Amount awarded: £29 173

Projects by themes

We have grouped projects under the five SPCR themes in this document

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Evidence synthesis working group

The collaboration will be conducting 18 high impact systematic reviews, under four workstreams.

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