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Dr Patrick Burch is currently an In-Practice Fellow at the University of Manchester. He is completing a Masters in primary care research methods (MRes) and helping to evaluate aspects of the NHS diabetes prevention programme (DPP).

Patrick
 “Coming from a clinical background, I feel, has given me a big advantage in understanding the relevance and problems with research. I regularly take part in meetings with groups of academics as part of the DPP evaluation project and, despite being inexperienced in academic terms, my input is valued because of my real world clinical experience. From a clinical perspective, engagement with research has made me question the validity of many of the practices/treatments that we take for granted and think more deeply about why we do what we do.”
- Dr Patrick Burch

Patrick co-authored a recent publication ‘Regional variation and predictors of over-registration in English primary care in 2014: a spatial analysis’ with colleagues Tim Doran and Evan Kontopantelis which prompted a blog ‘Working at the sharp end of an NHS initiative: Making sense of GP and nurse views on the NHS Diabetes Prevention Programme, for the NHS DPP website.

Patrick has been a GP since 2012 and had done solely clinical work before becoming interested in research again in 2016. “I approached Manchester University in December 2016, keen to get involved in some research. I am interested in many different aspects of healthcare and research and did not have a fixed idea of what I wanted to do. I discussed my position with Professor Kath Checkland and other academics and, through the NIHR School for Primary Care Research, they were able to offer me seedcorn funding in February 2017. This funding enabled me to experience life in an academic primary care department, take part in a research project looking into aspects of GP funding and develop an application for an In-Practice Fellowship.”